Fire Safety courses


Would you know what to do in a fire situation? Most of us like to think we would, but in reality individuals all do their own thing and delays ensue.
Planning and practice is all important (and in the workplace is usually a requirement by law). The ‘Fire Awareness’ course will prepare all staff for the risks and the actions which they should take in an emergency situation. For those with extra responsibility such as ‘The Responsible Person’ or Fire Marshall’s/Fire Warden the ‘Fire Marshall training’ will also explain those particular roles and help prepare for their responsibilities.

Fire Awareness 4hrs (or part of Induction Training)

In an emergency involving fire, the speed the fire spreads at is frightening. The law requires owners and managers to make plans for ensuring everybody is kept safe by either evacuating within the first few minutes, using a safe area (safe refuge) for those who have difficulty evacuating, making sure help is summoned and then making sure the fire can be contained. The Fire Awareness course will give all candidates an overview of what is expected of them in a fire. Course content is:

  • Legislation and possible punitive measures
  • The fire triangle
  • How to summon help in an emergency
  • Risk assessments
  • How to react when fire is discovered or the alarm is sounded
  • The type of equipment you might see around your workplace for fire protection or arrest and what it should or should not be used on
  • Do’s and do not’s in a fire emergency

Certificates will be issued on full attendance, but there is a small quiz at the end.

Fire Marshall training (6hrs) QCF Accredited

As with the Fire Awareness course this course will prepare staff for an emergency involving fire, but will also equip ‘The Responsible Person’ and the ‘Fire Marshall’s (or Fire Warden)’ for their extra responsibilities. Course content is:

  • Legislation and possible punitive measures
  • The fire triangle
  • How to summon help in an emergency
  • Risk assessments
  • How to react when fire is discovered or the alarm is sounded
  • The type of equipment you might see around your workplace for fire protection and what it should or should not be used on
  • Do’s and do not’s in a fire emergency
  • Reviewing risk assessments
  • Formulating a protocol for your workplace
  • Completing routine checks and keeping suitable records
  • Ensuring training is kept up-to-date

Assessment is by continual on-going assessment and summative test paper results.